How to Use a Semicolon

The semicolon gives equal weight to the clause before and the one after.
For serial listing comma lovers, it’s a hiccup in between.
I don’t mind using semicolons; however, I’ve been told I do so incorrectly.

That one clause, remember it? A pause for punctuation?
The moment stretched into years.
That time he emptied his closet?

An independent clause of 15 years.
Semicolon.
Another independent clause?

The list of reasons he gave: I don’t want to be married anymore;
I don’t want to be married anymore;
I don’t want to be married anymore.

That’s not a list.
And this isn’t an indepence equal to the one before.
No semicolon necessary.

Except here: the eyes seeing me crease with love smiles;
large hands touch me as if I am holy and precious;
the woodpile will last for many, many winters.

The Best Bad Dogs Ever (#29 NaPoWriMo Prompt)

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Cacophony announcing apocalypse,
Cattle dogs hard at work for the herd.
Ground squirrel, diving for cover while
Tongues lolling, muscles quivering, they wait.

When not pronouncing the end of the world
Their worlds end,
One each pressed to my sides,
Slack abandon in sleep.

This morning I carried my phone to the couch,
Intent on that morning coffee,
My husband in my hands (my heart, my
soul
) on video, pixels of love.

Colorado sunlight glinting off the screen and
BAI YI YI AOURRRRRRRR AY! AY! AY!
Pure fur, pure voice, rigid in attack
Set off by no more than a glimmer.

I look into my husband’s eyes,
Pixel to pixel,
Me muting the phone to save his ears.
Together: “They are the best bad dogs ever.”

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October 4th Plath Poetry Project calendar
Sylvia Plath’s The Arrival of the Bee Box

NaPoWriMo
And now for our daily prompt (optional, as always). Today, we’d like to challenge you to write a poem based on the Plath Poetry Project’s calendar. Simply pick a poem from the calendar, and then write a poem that responds or engages with your chosen Plath poem in some way.

Beauty and Joy: A Harvest (#27 NaPoWriMo Prompt)

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Four wands working  magic.
Country life for us.
Outside our home,
Forests for flying.

Followed by repose, concord, harmony.
We are rich, if not in money,
Then in time, love, and
Peace.

Embellished by moment
After moment, a string of nows,
Until the present glows.
Beauty and joy, our domestic harvest.

 

I’ve never had a reading or even looked at a Tarot card before, but I gave the prompt a try:
Tarot Card (Wands Four): From the four great staves planted in the foreground there is a great garland suspended; two female figures uplift nosegays; at their side is a bridge over a moat, leading to an old manorial house. Divinatory Meanings: They are for once almost on the surface–country life, haven of refuge, a species of domestic harvest-home, repose, concord, harmony, prosperity, peace, and the perfected work of these. Reversed: The meaning remains unaltered; it is prosperity, increase, felicity, beauty, embellishment.

NaPoWriMo

And now for today’s (optional) prompt. Following Lauren Hunter’s practice of relying on tarot cards to generate ideas for poems, we challenge you to pick a card (any card) from this online guide to the tarot, and then to write a poem inspired either by the card or by the images or ideas that are associated with it.